Albrecht Dürer (German, 1471-1528), Christ on the Mount of Olives - Recent Acquisition Details

Albrecht Dürer (German, 1471-1528), Christ on the Mount of Olives

Albrecht Dürer (German, 1471-1528), Christ on the Mount of Olives

Feb 3, 2016

 The Snite Museum of Art at the University of Notre Dame has acquired three 16th-century prints. Lucas van Leyden’s engraving The Raising of Lazarus (c. 1507) is an early work devoid of the Italianate features characteristic of van Leyden's mature years. Albrecht Dürer’s etching from an iron plate, Christ on the Mount of Olives (1515, printed ca. 1550), left, is one of six etchings Dürer experimented with before abandoning the new medium entirely. Unable to control the biting and dissatisfied with the tonal range of etching, he returned to woodcut and engraving. The print is evidence of Dürer’s penchant for experimentation and provides insight into his creative process. Jan and Lucas van Doetecum’s Saint Jerome in the Wilderness, after Pieter Bruegel, the Elder (1555–56), left, is one of twelve prints called The Large Landscapes, a landmark series in printmaking and one of the first among large-scale prints dedicated to views of nature. The work demonstrates the collaborative nature of printmaking. The original drawing by Bruegel was translated by the Van Doetecum brothers into a print. The Snite Museum also acquired a portfolio of 28 prints by the quixotic Irish artist James Barry (1741–1806). These new additions enhance Notre Dame’s position as a leading center for Irish, 18th-century, and art historical studies. The artist’s grand scale and heroic subjects offer much to contemplate and enjoy. This collection was built over four decades by Nancy and William Pressly. William Pressly was the foremost scholar on Barry and professor emeritus at the University of Maryland. The collection represents more than half of Barry's print production, making the Notre Dame and the Yale Center for British Art the two largest repositories of Barrry's work in the US. The acquisition of eighteen of the prints was made possible by a generous gift from the F. T. Stent Family with additional prints donated by the Presslys.